[Social Investment Ethics]: DO WE NEED ETHICS IN SOCIAL INVESTMENT? #econable

Consider this conversation from 2009, where social business pioneers are being asked who will build a more efficient social marketplace.

Note in particular, the words of Terry Hallman, who died two years later, in August 2011. He refers to the theft of intellectual property. saying:

“So, if we’re inventing projects that we know will be stolen, there are at least two problem areas.

First, if stolen, it’s stolen. It’s not unlike an architect having a building design stolen. The architect/designer is in best position to understand exactly how it works and how to assemble what they’ve designed.

Second, even if the project outcome, after theft, is what was envisioned by the designer(s), how does the venture qualify as a social enterprise? Sure, we can slowly design projects one by one as income from our funding side permits. We can do it a lot faster if we get paid for our R&D output, just like any designers.

Finally, is it acceptable to build projects with stolen property? What sort of results would that lead to? Can be build an ethical system based upon unethical behavior (such as violations of Intellectual Property Rights)?

If we invent such a system, is it anything new? Or is it just a twist on the old system?

One thing that can be collaborated openly is this: a Code of Ethics. But, whose ethics? What org(s) will enforce them, and how? Who decides who gets in, how, and why?”

Now think about it. Can we really build a better world by pushing each other out of the way? Is there any social return in keeping what others have to say out of media and censoring us from online dialogue? A death in social enterprise may be an uncomfortable truth, but perhaps not as uncomfortable as the truth that children are denied a humane existence through absence of solidarity.

Economics for Humanity

(A story of one man’s challenge to organised crime, discovering government were not in his corner)

It might at first seem redundant to ask whether investment with  social and environmental objectives needs to be ethical, since this would appear to be what many consider to be ethical business.

Consider this conversation from 2009, where social business pioneers are being asked who will build a more efficient social marketplace.

Note in particular, the words of Terry Hallman, who died two years later,  in August 2011. He refers to the theft of intellectual property. saying:

“So, if we’re inventing projects that we know will be stolen, there are at least two problem areas.

First, if stolen, it’s stolen. It’s not unlike an architect having a building design stolen. The architect/designer is in best position to understand exactly how it works and how to assemble what they’ve designed.

If someone wants to…

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