Creating a dynamic learning process in the fast lane!


It’s imperative to bring creativity to learning, enabling us to be innovative!

Greatest challenge to innovation: reinventing our whole way of living!

Walking the positive road!
Building the NEW! Cultivate change! Do it with passion!

PASSIONS create future!
Find strength in your uniqueness of your purpose, your gifts & your passions!

Imagine what could be, to be the future!
Happiness is a journey not a destination!

“Forget about the ‘fast lane’. If you really want to fly, just harness your power to your passion!” ~ Oprah Winfrey

psdt-from-growth-to-progress

from obsessed growth to healthy progress

presentation available on SlideShare (follow the link)

 

Speaking engagement at International Training & Development Summit (Circuits of Learning and Development)

Presentation for PSDT (Philippine Society for Training and Development) annual convention November 2017

http://www.pstd.org

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Emerging Future of Organizations, Communities and Humanity!


Facilitating change through the Transition Narrative towards Society 3.0 (Humanity 4.0)

picture2

Transition from surviving to sustainable development, from resilience building towards a thriving world in which humanity is inspired by & lives in balance & harmony with nature.

5P’s of sustainable thrivability

People – Planet – Progress – Purpose – Passion

5ps-thrivability-is-harmony

INSPIRE people in HARMONY with the planet
for BALANCED progress towards
building communities that THRIVE!

from-surviving-to-thriving

Facilitate transformational changes in social values, resource needs and technological advancements, in which people, their capacities and human values matter and are central to the approach.

UNlearn to RElearn

picture3

Focus on CAPACITIES
= uniqueness + limitations
of self, team, company & extended enterprise to enable
collaboration, co-design and co-creation

 econverge-4-5-right-size

Inspire one – 1x = X1 – motivate many!

 

Learn from the changing world and share your change to the macro!
Learn how you can participate your contributive change at the micro!
We change the way we LIVE! We change the way of LIFE!
Thriving in the flow of Life! Ideas for Life! Soul of Life!

For humanity and communities

(self and your immediate environment)

From ME to WE,
from EGO to ECO,
from SILOS to COLLECTIVE CREATIVITY

Connecting the econological shift (following the sequence is essential)

  • spiritual connected: connection between self and self
  • social connected: connection between self and others
  • ecological connected: connection between self and nature

Encouraging entrepreneurship (social, community and/or commercial)

econological-shift

For organizations and extended enterprise

(corporates, institutions and their stakeholders – extended enterprise)

From SHAREHOLDER to STAKEHOLDER Economics!
From GROWTH & PROFIT to PROGRESS!
Adding the 2Ps: PASSION & PURPOSE
Think, act and lead without the box!

Transforming organizations and the extended enterprise to form lattice TEAL circles and working environments, which are agile, holistic and open.

Encouraging intrapreneurship (innovation, co-creation and agility)

 without-the-box

How to ignore the box

  • apply lateral thinking techniques (TEAL – lattice circles & agile OD)
  • rethink situations as opportunities
  • connect the dots between creativity & innovation
  • walk the positive road – Learn to dream (Ai)
  • generate innovative opportunities aligned with your needs
  • promote intrapreneurship | encourage entrepreneurship

Lattice or TEAL organization forms take on worn-out corporate ladder inproductivity and adopt more agile ways to engage its people, processes and ultimately the extended enterprise in which a corporation operates.

Whole Systems Transformation is a journey!
Systemic change is required at all levels of our society!

whole-system-transformation-modality-sullivan-transformation-agents

Whole System Transformation modality (Sullivan Transformation Agents)

Some references in this emerging evolution

Otto Scharmer (Theory U & Presencing Institute)

We are collectively creating results nobody wants. That’s why leadership should help people to see the whole system. It is time to change our organizations and institutions, and bust three leadership myths.

3 visible divides:

The ecological divide: we currently use 1.5 times Planet Earth; that is our ecological footprint. This is the divide between self and nature.

The social divide: 2.5 billion people live on less than $2 a day. Here we see the divide between self and other.

The spiritual-cultural divide: people are excluded, experience lack of meaning and more and more feel depressed. The divide between self and Self. Capital Self represents your highest future potential that you may develop – what you are here for on Planet Earth.

Frederic Laloux (Reinventing Organizations)

If we define Tops, Middle, Bottoms, and Customers, not as static boxes on an org chart, but as relational spaces or contexts, then they are still very much present. People just flow and navigate between these different spaces, including within the same day. So, on one initiative I am leading it, and I am in a Top space. Another time, somebody else is leading and I am just following; I am the Bottom. And in another situation, I might be sort of the Middle, somebody else is really leading the big picture of it, but I am designing some elements; I am coordinating some stuff.

And what this brings I think, is an enormous relief for the Bottoms and the Middles, and also for the Tops! We tend to think that being Top is so great. We often underestimate the weight of the poor people at the Top of the organizations who constantly have to be Top, and can never relax into Bottom, where I can just follow. I will do my share, but I don’t need to be in a leadership position”.

Hierarchy isn’t abandoned at Teal; what is dismantled is the static form of hierarchy that is in the buttress of the org chart. The goal of self-management is not to make everyone equal, to have everyone having the same say on all the questions. It is really the opposite. It’s to have natural hierarchies, and to have lots of natural hierarchies.

 

The following illustrations may assist you in understanding the evolutionary transition of humanity and how we transform communities and organizations to adapt to the changing future:

evolutionary-breakthroughs-in-human-collaboration

Evolutionary breakthroughs in human collaboration

evolution-of-organizational-paradimgs

The evolution of organizational paradigms

 

evolution-from-change-management-to-change-facilitation

Evolution from Change Management to Change Facilitation

kotter-8-step-change-model

Kotter 8 step change model

Stages of human evolution according to  Frederic Laloux and Otto Scharmer

Stages of human evolution according to Frederic Laloux and Otto Scharmer

The challenge response matrix

The challenge response matrix

Social Evolution Matrix

Social Evolution Matrix co-creative eco-systems

Paradigms of Economic Thought

Paradigms of Economic Thought: symptoms of systemic disconnects

Transformation process

From hierarchical control structure to ecological approach with whole systems transformation.

Theory U - Leading from the Emerging Future

Theory U – Leading from the Emerging Future

 

biomimicry-applying-natures-principles

Biomimicry – applying nature’s principles

Further reading:

Reinventing Organizations
~ by Frederic Laloux
www.reinventingorganizations.com
www.reinventingorganizationswiki.com

Leading from the Emerging Future
~ by Otto Scharmer
www.ottoscharmer.com
www.presencing.com

Perspectives on Teal: Laloux & Scharmer
~ by Michael Stern, Integral Alignment, for Enlivening Edge Magazine
www.enliveningedge.org/features/weaving-perspectives-teal-organizational-economic-mystical
www.enliveningedge.org/features/weaving-perspectives-part-2-response-ability-living-systems/

 

Other sources of reference active in this transition:

Alexander Laszlo – Leadership and Systemic Innovation, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Anna Blume – Impact Journey – Creating the Future
Arthur Brock – Agile Learning Center
Bernard Lietaer – The Future of Money: Beyond Greed and Scarcity Rethinking Money, Complementary Currencies
Bert-Ola Bergstrand – SoCap – Living Bridges, LUSIC, Skoll Foundation
Charles Eisenstein – Sacred Economics
Dana Pearlman – Global Leadership Lab
Dave Snowden – Cognitive Edge
David Cooperrider – Appreciative Inquiry
David Eggleton – Applied Ecologics
David Hodgson – Global Leadership Lab
David Suzuki – Solutions are in our nature, interconnected and interdependent with nature.
Della Duncan and Robert Raymond – Economics for Transition
Edgar H. Schein – Humble Leadership, The Essence of Change: Brainwashing, Culture Evolution and Organizational Therapy
Ellen MacArthur – transition to a circular economy
Erwin Van Waeleghem – Teal-for-Teal, Tealpirator
Eugen Oetringer – Leading in a Complex Environment
George Pór – Enlivening Edge
Giles Hutchins – Future Fit, Illuzion of Separation, Cultivating Leadership
Giorgio Bertini – Learnign Change
Gunter Pauli – The Blue Economy, ZERI
Holger Nauheimer – Radical Inclusion, Change Facilitation
Irma Wilson – Social Innovation Europe, the Next Edge, FutureSharp
Jae Sabol – One Community
Jean Russell – Thrivable.org, Co-creation
Jeff Mowatt – People-Centered Economic Development
Jennifer Sertl – Agility3R, Strategy,Leadership and the Soul
Jeremiah Owyang – Collaborative Economy
Jeremy Rifkin – The Zero Marginal Cost Society, The Third Industrial Revolution
Johan Roels – Crucial Dialogues
John Elkington – Breakthrough Business Models
John Hagel – Deloitte Center for the Edge
John Kellden – ConversationLab
Kathryn Ananda – Positive Handprints, 5P’s of Thrivability
Katie Teague – Money and Life Movie
Kelly Teamey – Enlivened Learning
Kevin Parcell – The Reconomy Global Cooperative
Klaus Bravenboer – Biomimicry in Organizational System Design
Leif Edvinsson – New Club of Paris, Universal Networking Intellectual Capital
Marcella Bremer – Leadership Change
Mario Fleurinck – Digital transformation
Maureen Kelsey – Call2Change
Michael Reuben SternIntegral Alignment
Michel A. de Kemmeter – Otherways – UHDR
Michel Bouwens – P2P Foundation, Safe the World
Michelle Holliday – The Age of Thrivability, Thrivable World
Paul Polak – Design for the other 90%, iDEorg
Peter Senge – System Thinking, Society for Organizational Learning, The Fifth Discipline
Peter Vander Auwera – Sacred Spaces, InnoTribr
Rafael Staelens – Planetecova
Ralph Thurm – GISR – Global Initiative for Sustainability Ratings, A|HEAD|, Embedding ThriveAbility
Robert ReichInequality for all, Saving Capitalism
Robin Lincoln Wood – Embedding ThriveAbility Foundation
Roland Sullivan – Whole Systems Transformation
Sarah van Gils – Syntony, Evolutionary Leadership
Stanislas Jourdan – basic income, Quantitative Easing
Steve Keen – Debunking Economocs, Debt Deflation, IDEAeconomics
Thomas Friedman – The World is Flat
Torben Rick – Organizational Culture Change
Yasuhiko Genku Kimura – Vision in Action

and many more.

Also @econolgics may be a good source for keeping up to date on the subject of our changing world.

Join the dialogue & participate with a circle of people making a difference growing from surviving to sustainable development, from resilience building towards a thriving world in which humanity is inspired by & lives in balance & harmony with nature.

We drive change for a better environment, life & future for generations to come.

@econologics unites people making a difference in our socio-economic & -political society. We share & brainstorm ideas & practices around new models from around the globe, exploring opportunities for collaboration to establish both public and corporate sustainability, resiliency and thrivability.

The group aims to advocate change to our global-2-glocal environment – from our smallest circle of family, friends, acquaintances to the professional circles & circles of influence we develop in this connected world.

@econologics – sustainable balance in our social & economic circle of life!

li-fb-g-econologics-400x400

LI: www.linkedin.com/groups/Econologics-3825482
FB: www.facebook.com/groups/Econologics
G+: http://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/116249886169285481548
PaperLi: http://linkis.com/paper.li/Zj1Rr
Follow us on twitter @knowledgEnabler
www.twitter.com/knowledgEnabler

You can also contact us for coaching and speaker engagements

www.expertfile.com/experts/joris.claeys

or connect with me on LinkedIn:

www.linkedin.com/in/knowledgenabler

We facilitate and cultivate change

For companies, teams and CXO levels:
Intrapreneurs coaching & branding/strategy for corporations

capixCAPix – expanding horizon
Think, lead & act without the box!
Moving Knowledge & Solutions Forward!
www.linkedin.com/company/capix
www.facebook.com/CAPix.horizon

For communities and entrepreneurs:
Entrepreneurs & incubation coaching for the creativity sector

econovateecoNOVATEcommunity driven innovation
Making communities & business human again!
www.linkedin.com/company/ecoNOVATE
www.facebook.com/ecoNOVATE.net

The Teal-Evolutionary paradigm!


Frederick Laloux examines the evolution of human consciousness, explaining how Humanity invented a new, more productive organizational model every time when it shifted to a new stage.

Creativity and innovation in business seem to be more important than ever. Many companies are desperately seeking new ideas, trying to keep up while still applying a traditional organizational structure that has not been reviewed and changed for a long time.

It seems obvious that continuing to push for innovation without innovating the system itself is flogging a dead horse, but since this is the norm, we take it for granted that this is the only way. The well-known hierarchical, rule-based management style has its benefits and has worked well for a long time, but as the world is changing, it seems to have reached its limits and cannot serve us anymore.
It is time to realize that if we want to unleash human potential, we need to change the surroundings and provide the right conditions for those new ideas to thrive.

One of today’s disruptive trends is doing exactly that. A new organizational paradigm is emerging, turning our current concept of work and management upside down. This gamechanger that might transform the way we work is called “Teal”.

full story by Julia Marczi at
http://www.startupsuccessstories.com/the-new-big-deal-is-called-teal

“By breaking the box we can empower people to get out of it!” – Frederick Laloux

Laloux Culture Model by Peter Green

Lean and Agile Adoption with the Laloux Culture Model by Peter Green

Teal organizations bring the following three breakthroughs:

  1. Self-management: assuming that people are trustworthy, good and accountable, and can deliver without being controlled all the time, Teal organizations work without (traditional) managers, dogmatic rules and policies. Project management is also radically simplified. Job titles are abolished and are replaced by roles that are picked up based on each individual’s talents, interests and skills.
  2. Wholeness: people are encouraged to show up at work with their whole personality, not just a professional, edited version of themselves. Being human, having doubts and emotions and making mistakes are OK. “Failure” is considered as an opportunity to learn.
  3. Evolutionary Purpose: instead of considering the organization as a mere vehicle for delivering management targets and maximizing shareholder profit,  it is seen as an organic, living entity with an ever-changing purpose. Teal organizations ask questions like: How can we serve the world best? How can we deliver real value? The organization and its members are actively listening all the time to this purpose, adjusting its activities to it, instead of following well-defined, detailed management plans.

Teal organizations as “complex adaptive systems”

An Evolutionary-Teal organization exhibits many properties of a Complex Adaptive System

  1. It has a purpose of its own, distinct from the purposes or objectives of its members,
  2. It consists of a number of elements (members or teams),
  3. The elements interact, in a non-linear way, to achieve the purpose of the system,
  4. The interaction and relationships between elements are based on a few simple rules or guiding principles,
  5. The nature of the relationships and number of interactions between the elements result in emergent behavior – the behavior of the system is not the sum of the behaviors of the elements,
  6. The elements produce and use signals and information (sensing) from both external and internal environments and react accordingly,
  7. There is no central control,
  8. The elements self-organize, that is, change the relationships between themselves to adapt to changes in the environment,
  9. The elements learn from history, and from the environment, and adapt accordingly to ensure the survival of the system.

Teal organizations are run by self-managing teams. These teams consists of workers who each fulfill certain roles, including functional and managerial duties. All decisions are made using a simple advice process and/or a conflict resolution process when appropriate. There is no centralized control. Values are no longer given perfunctory attention but are actually lived in how people behave in the organization. Everyone listens to the organization’s purpose and takes action accordingly while sensing for changes in the environment. Out of these collective actions, the behavior of the organization emerges.

 

more info on Frederic Laloux‘s Reinventing Organizations at:
www.reinventingorganizations.com
www.reinventingorganizationswiki.com

Inspire one – 1x = X1 – motivate many! People – Planet – Progress – Purpose – Passion


Follow the blog by @knowledgEnabler & @econologics and discover the 5P’s of sustainable thrivability.
knowledgEvolution – incisive knowledge converged


@econologics – sustainable balance in our social & economic circle of life!
ecoNVERGE – inspire ● balance ● harmony
Think, lead and act without the box!
We change the way we LIVE! – We change the way of LIFE!

Awareness-based collective action leadership!


Collective Mindfulness: The Leader’s New Work! 
– by Otto Scharmer

Collective sleepwalking results in three deep divides that are the signature of our civilizational crisis today:
1. the ecological divide — the disconnect between self and nature (resulting in overuse of planet Earth’s finite resources — we are using 1.5 planets today);
2. the social divide — the disconnect between self and other (resulting in two societies: the 1 percent vs. the 99 percent); and
3. the spiritual divide — the disconnect between self and self (resulting in suicide now taking more lives than war, murder, and natural disasters combined).

 

Theory U -- Leading from the Emerging Future

Theory U — Leading from the Emerging Future

 

The Blind Spot

The root cause of our current economic and civilizational crisis is not Wall Street (although the decoupling of the financial and the real economy is a huge problem). It’s not infinite growth (although overusing earth’s finite resources is another enormous problem). It’s not Big Business or Big Government (although their disconnect from the real needs in our communities needs to be fixed). It’s also not leadership, governance, or ownership. The primary root cause is more fundamental than any of these structural issues or systemic disconnects.

Our current crisis originates between our ears: in our outdated paradigms of economic thought. It originates in the disconnect between our dominant models of economic thought (which gravitate around ego-system awareness, in which stakeholders maximize benefit only for themselves) and the collaboration imperatives of our global eco-system economy (in which stakeholders seek to improve the well-being of all, including themselves). We have an enormous disconnect between ego-system thinking and the eco-system reality.

What’s really needed is a deeper shift of consciousness. We need to care and act not just for ourselves and a few close partners, but in the interest of the entire eco-system in which economic activity takes place.

  • The Leader’s New Work: Bending the Beam of Observation 
  • Personal Transformation: From Me to We
  • Relational Transformation: From Ego to Eco
  • Institutional Transformation: From Silos to Collective Creativity
  • Building An Awareness Based Collective Leadership School

To support this ego to eco shift we need a new type of awareness-based collective action leadership school — a distributed platform that focuses on pioneering profound innovations by an approach that links and integrates all sectors (business, government, civil society), system levels (micro, macro, mundo) and all intelligences (head, heart, hand).

From Ego-system to Eco-system – Leading from the Emerging Future!


The problem with capitalism originates between our ears!
– by Otto Scharmer of Theory-U and Presencing Institute brings the best-ever overview of requirements of the Transition Narrative (ecoNVERGE / @ Econologics) for humanity to evolve to a new Paradigm Shift.

Otto Schramer

The root cause of today’s global crises originates between our ears

 

Profound personal, societal and global renewal is not only possible; it is crucial for our planetary future. What is needed are change makers willing to lead from the emerging future; leaders who are willing to learn about and practice the journey from ego-system to eco-system economies. We have the places, living examples, frameworks and tools in hand. Now what we need is the co-creative vision and the common will to bringing it into reality.

10 insights from our new book Leading From the Emerging Future: From Ego-system to Eco-system Economies

We live in an age of profound disruption. Global crises, such as finance, food, fuel, water, resource scarcity and poverty challenge just about every aspect of society. Yet, this disruption also brings the possibility of profound personal, societal and global renewal. We need to stop and ask: Why do we collectively create results nobody wants? What keeps us locked into the old ways of operating? And what can we do to transform these root issues that keep us trapped in the patterns of the past?

1) The root cause of today’s global crises originates between our ears — in our outdated paradigms of economic thought

A structural disconnect between:

  • the infinite growth imperative and the finite resources of planet earth;
  • between the Haves and the Have Nots;
  • between the financial and the real economy;
  • between technology and real societal needs;
  • between institutional leadership and people;
  • between gross domestic product (GDP) and actual well-being;
  • between governance mechanisms and the voiceless in our systems; and
  • between actual ownership forms and best societal use of property.

 

Three Levels Symptoms Systemic Disconnects Paradigms of Economic Thought

Three Levels: Symptoms; Systemic Disconnects; Paradigms of Economic Thought

2) The blind spot of modern economic thought can be summarized with a single word: consciousness
3) The evolution of the economy and of modern economic thought mirrors the footprints of an evolving human consciousness

The stages of economic development that come with them:

  • 1.0 Organizing around centralized coordination
  • 2.0 Organizing around decentralized coordination
  • 3.0 Organizing around special interest group driven coordination
  • 4.0 Organizing around commons

4) To paraphrase Einstein, the problem with today’s capitalism is that we are trying “to solve problems with the same consciousness that created them”
5) Helping stakeholder systems shift their way of operating from ego-system to eco-system awareness is the central leadership challenge of our time
6) The shift from ego-system to eco-system awareness requires a journey that involves walking in the shoes of other stakeholders and attending to the three instruments of inner knowing: open mind, open heart, and open will

 

Theory U: One Process, Three Instruments (Open Mind, Open Heart, Open Will)

Theory U: One Process, Three Instruments (Open Mind, Open Heart, Open Will)

 

The effectiveness of accessing these three instruments depends on the ability to deal with the sources of resistance (“three enemies”):

  • VoJ (Voice of Judgment): The VoJ shuts down the Open Mind by habitually judging self and others. All creativity techniques start with somehow suspending the VoJ.
  • VoC (Voice of Cynicism): The VoC shuts down the Open Heart by offering an easy alternative to making oneself vulnerable. The problem with that easy exit is that it does the same thing as the VoJ: it blocks one’s opening process for accessing the deeper sources of creativity.
  • VoF (Voice of Fear): The VoF tends to shut down the Open Will by not letting go but holding on to old identities, ideologies, and Us vs. Them belief structures.

7) Addressing the current global crisis at its root calls for a 4.0 update of the economic operating system through reframing eight “acupuncture points” of the global economic system

They are:

  1. Nature: Close the feedback loop of production, consumption, reuse, and recycling through “earth-to-earth” or closed-loop design.
  2. Labor: Close the feedback loop from work (jobs) to Work (passion) by building infrastructures that foster and ignite inspired entrepreneurship.
  3. Capital: Close the feedback loop of capital by redirecting speculative investment into ecological, social, and cultural-creative renewal.
  4. Technology: Close the feedback loop from technology creation to societal needs in underserved communities through needs assessment and participatory planning.
  5. Leadership: Close the feedback loop from leadership to the emerging future of the whole through practices of co-sensing, co-inspiring, and co-creating.
  6. Consumption: Close the feedback loop from economic output to the well-being of all through conscious, collaborative consuming and through new well-being indicators such as GNH (Gross National Happiness).
  7. Coordination: Close the feedback loop in the economy from the parts to the whole through ABC (awareness-based collective action).
  8. Ownership: Close the feedback loop from ownership rights to the best societal use of assets through shared ownership and commons-based property rights that safeguard the interests of future generations.
Eight Acupuncture Points of Transforming Capitalism to 4.0

Eight Acupuncture Points of Transforming Capitalism to 4.0

 

8) Shifting the system to 4.0 requires a threefold revolution

Inversion means turning inside-out and outside-in:

  • Individual inversion means to open up thinking (open mind), feeling (open heart), and will (open will) in order to learn to act as an instrument for the future that is wanting to emerge.
  • Relational inversion means to open up communicative relationships from downloading (conforming) and debate (defending) to dialogue (reflective inquiry) and collective creativity (flow) in order to tune as groups into the field of the future.
  • Institutional inversion means to open traditional institutional geometries of power from 1.0 and 2.0 forms of coordinating and organizing — centralized hierarchy and decentralized competition — to 3.0 and 4.0 forms of coordinating around co-creative stakeholder relationships in eco-systems that generate well-being for all.
The Matrix of Social Evolution (all system levels, all structures of attention)

The Matrix of Social Evolution (all system levels, all structures of attention)

the three transformations for the individual (column 1), the relational (column 2) and the institutional inversion (column 3 and 4) in the form of a Matrix of Social Evolution that integrates all system levels (micro-meso-maco-mundo) and all structures of awareness (1.0 to 4.0).
9) We need new types of innovation infrastructures in order to build collective leadership capacities on a massive scale

These infrastructures will include:

  • Co-initiating: Creating spaces for convening stakeholders around a shared eco-system
  • Co-sensing: Going to the places of most potential and observing with one’s mind and heart wide open
  • Co-inspiring: Creating spaces for connecting to the sources of creativity and self
  • Co-creating: Creating spaces for exploring the future by doing (prototyping)
  • Co-shaping: Creating spaces for embodying and scaling the new through practices

10) The shift from an ego-system to an eco-system economy requires a global movement that needs to be supported by a new leadership school. That school should create collaborative platforms across sectors, systems, and generations and work through integrating science, art, and the practice of profound, awareness-based change

Such a new leadership school would be a home base for the emerging global movement of 4.0-related transformation journeys. At the same time, it would prototype a 21st century action university that integrates three forms of knowledge:

  • technical knowledge (know-what),
  • practical knowledge (know-how) and
  • transformation knowledge (know-who: self knowledge).

 

An Ego-2-Eco Transformation Leadership School—A Set of Global Acupuncture Points

An Ego-2-Eco Transformation Leadership School—A Set of Global Acupuncture Points

 

Set of principles that are essential for this type of school and which are designed for global-local replication:

  1. Engage systems at all levels and states: Engage systems by using the entire Matrix of Social Evolution.
  2. Engage all levels of intelligence: Integrate open mind (IQ: intellectual knowledge), open heart (EQ: emotional and relational knowledge), and open will (SQ: self knowledge).
  3. Systems Thinking: Integrate methods and tools derived from 30 years of organizational learning research and practice. 
  4. MOOCs: Use massive open online courses that combine course delivery with interactive personal, small-group dialogue and the presence of a global community of change makers that effects transformative change.
  5. Deep immersion: Use deep dive learning journeys and generative listening practices in order to connect communities and places of most potential.
  6. Science 2.0: Use scientific methods that let the “data talk to you.” The challenges of this century involve extending the concept of science beyond looking exclusively at exterior data (third-person view). We need to bend the beam of scientific observation back upon the observer in order to investigate the more subtle levels of experience of the second- and first-person view.
  7. Presencing: Use practices that allow leaders to sense and actualize the emerging future and to clarify the two root questions of creativity: Who is my Self? What is my Work?
  8. Power of Intention: Focus on the capacity to connect with the deeper intention of one’s journey, connecting us more deeply with one another, the world and ourselves.
  9. Prototyping: Link head, heart, and hand in order to create living examples and prototypes that allow us to explore the future by doing.
  10. Power of Place: Complement the massive expansion of online learning with an equally massive global network of vibrant entrepreneurial hubs that focus on activating co-sensing and co-creating as a gateway for unleashing entrepreneurial potential. Great innovations happen in places. Learning how to design and hold spaces for reflection, generative conversation, and system-wide transformation is a mission critical capacity today.

Enterprise Incisive Converged Knowledge – New tools and a new way of working for a new era!


Continuous Productivity: New tools and a new way of working for a new era!
– paper by Steven Sinofsky
excerpt from Learning by Shipping
Note by CAPix: This paper describes very well how we are moving into Enterprise Incisive Converged Knowledge. Technologies are developing, organizations are adapting and new generations of people coming on board of the workforce are defining how collaboration is evolving between people, data and technology.

It also makes for an amazing opportunity to transform how organizations make products, serve customers, and do the work of corporations. We’re on the verge of seeing an entire rewrite of the management canon of the 20th century. New ways of organizing, managing, working, collaborating are being enabled by the tools of the continuous productivity paradigm shift.

 

553698_10101017579649025_101860817_nclick the picture for the full article by Steven Sinofsky

What happens when the tools and technologies we use every day become mainstream parts of the business world? What happens when we stop leading separate “consumer” and “professional” lives when it comes to technology stacks? The result is a dramatic change in the products we use at work and as a result an upending of the canon of management practices that define how work is done.

This paper says business must embrace the consumer world and see it not as different, less functional, or less enterprise-worthy, but as the new path forward for how people will use technology platforms, how businesses will organize and execute work, and how the roles of software and hardware will evolve in business.

Paradigm shift

Continuous productivity is an era that fosters a seamless integration between consumer and business platforms. Today, tools and platforms used broadly for our non-work activities are often used for work, but under the radar.

Continuous productivity manifests itself as an environment where the evolving tools and culture make it possible to innovate more and faster than ever, with significantly improved execution. Continuous productivity shifts our efforts from the start/stop world of episodic work and work products to one that builds on the technologies that start to answer what happens when:

  • A generation of new employees has access to the collective knowledge of an entire profession and experts are easy to find and connect with.
  • Collaboration takes place across organization and company boundaries with everyone connected by a social fiber that rises above the boundaries of institutions.
  • Data, knowledge, analysis, and opinion are equally available to every member of a team in formats that are digital, sharable, and structured.
  • People have the ability to time slice, context switch, and proactively deal with situations as they arise, shifting from a world of start/stop productivity and decision-making to one that is continuous.

Knowledge productivity

The problems created by the success of mechanized production were met with a solution—the introduction of the computer and the start of the information revolution. The mid-20th century would kick off a revolution in business, business marked by global and connected organizations. Knowledge created a new culture of business derived from the information gathering and analysis capabilities of first the mainframe and then the PC.

The essence of knowledge was the people-centric office which focused on ever-improving analysis and decision-making to allocate capital, develop products and services, and coordinate the work across the globe. The modern organization model of a board of directors, executives, middle management, and employees grew out of these new capabilities. Management of these knowledge-centric organizations happened through an ever-increasing network of middle-managers. The definition of work changed and most employees were not directly involved in making things, but in analyzing, coordinating, or servicing the products and services a company delivered.

The information available to management grew exponentially. Middle-management grew to spend their time researching, tabulating, reporting, and reconciling the information sources available. Information spanned from quantitative to qualitative and the successful leaders were expert or well versed in not just navigating or validating information, but in using it to effectively influence the organization as a whole. Knowledge is power in this environment. Management took over the role of resource allocation from owners and focused on decision-making as the primary effort, using knowledge and the skills of middle management to inform those choices.

Today’s workplace: Continuous Productivity
Today’s workplace is as different as the office was from the factory.

Today’s organizations are either themselves mobile or serving customers that are mobile, or likely both. Mobility is everywhere we look—from apps for consumers to sales people in stores and the cash registers to plane tickets. With mobility comes an unprecedented degree of freedom and flexibility—freedom from locality, limited information, and the desktop computer.

The knowledge-based organization spent much energy on connecting the dots between qualitative sampling and data sourced on what could be measured.

The following table contrasts the way we work between the historic norms and continuous productivity.

The following table contrasts the way we work between the historic norms and continuous productivity.

Transition versus disruption

The biggest risks organizations face is in thinking the transition to a new way of working will be just that, a transition, rather than a disruption. While individuals within an organization, particularly those that might be in senior management, will seek to smoothly transition from one style of work to another, the bulk of employees will switch quickly. Interns, new hires, or employees looking for an edge see these changes as the new normal or the only normal they’ve ever experienced. Our own experience with PCs is proof of how quickly change can take place.

Culture of continuous productivity

The culture of continuous productivity enabled by new tools is literally a rewrite of the past 30 years of management doctrine. Hierarchy, top-down decision making, strategic plans, static competitors, single-sided markets, and more are almost quaint views in a world literally flattened by the presence of connectivity, mobility, and data. The impact of continuous productivity can be viewed through the organization, individuals and teams, and the role of data.

The cultural changes encouraged or enabled by continuous productivity include:

  • Innovate more and faster
  • Flatten hierarchy
  • Improve execution
  • Respond to changes using telemetry / data
  • Strengthen organization and partnerships
  • Focus on the destination, not the journey

Organization culture change

Continuously productive organizations look and feel different from traditional organizations. As a comparison, consider how different a reunion (college, family, etc.) is in the era of Facebook usage. When everyone gets together there is so much more that is known—the reunion starts from shared context and “intimacy”. Organizations should be just as effective, no matter how big or how geographically dispersed.

Effective organizations were previously defined by rhythms of weekly, monthly and quarterly updates. These “episodic” connection points had high production values (and costs) and ironically relatively low retention and usage. Management liked this approach as it placed a high value on and required active management as distinct from the work. Tools were designed to run these meetings or email blasts, but over time these were far too often over-produced and tended to be used more for backward looking pseudo-accountability.

Looking ahead, continuously productive organizations will be characterized by the following:

  • Execution-centric focus
  • Management framing context with teams deciding
  • Outside is your friend
  • Employees see management participate and learn, everyone has the tools of management
  • Individuals own devices, organizations develop and manage IP

Individuals and teams work differently

The new tools and techniques come together to improve upon the way individuals and teams interact. Just as the first communication tools transformed business, the tools of mobile and continuous productivity change the way interactions happen between individuals and teams.

  • Sense and respond
  • Bottom up and network centric
  • Team and crowd spanning the internal and external
  • Unstructured work rhythm

Data becomes pervasive (and big)

With software capabilities come ever-increasing data and information. While the 20th century enabled the collection of data and to a large degree the analysis of data to yield ever improving decisions in business, the prevalence of continuous data again transforms business.

  • Sharing data continuously
  • Always up to date
  • Yielding best statistical approach informed by telemetry (induction)
  • Valuing more usage

New generation of productivity tools, examples and checklist

Bringing together new technologies and new methods for management has implications that go beyond the obvious and immediate. We will all certainly be bringing our own devices to work, accessing and contributing to work from a variety of platforms, and seeing our work take place across organization boundaries with greater ease. We can look very specifically at how things will change across the tools we use, the way we communicate, how success is measured, and the structure of teams.

Tools will be quite different from those that grew up through the desktop PC era. At the highest level the implications about how tools are used are profound. New tools are being developed today—these are not “ports” of existing tools for mobile platforms, but ideas for new interpretations of tools or new combinations of technologies.

The user experience of this new generation of productivity tools takes on a number of attributes that contrast with existing tools, including:

  • Continuous v. episodic
  • Online and shared information
  • Low startup costs
  • Sharing inside and outside
  • Measured enterprise integration
  • Mobile first
  • Devices in many sizes

Building on the sealed case platform, a new generation of applications will exhibit a significant number of the following attributes at the architecture and implementation level. As with all transitions, debates will rage over the relative strength or priority of one or more attributes for an app or scenario (“is something truly cloud” or historically “is this a native GUI”). Over time, if history is any guide, the preferred tools will exhibit these and other attributes as a first or native priority, and de-prioritize the checklists that characterized the “best of” apps for the previous era.

The following is a checklist of attributes of tools for continuous productivity:

  • Mobile first
  • Cloud first
  • User experience is platform native or browser exploitive
  • Tools are discrete, loosely coupled, limited surface area
  • Data contributed is data extractable
  • Metadata is as important as data
  • Files move from something you manage to something you use when needed
  • Identity is a choice
  • User experience has a memory and is aware and predictive
  • Telemetry is essential / privacy redefined
  • Participation is a feature
  • Business communication becomes indistinguishable from social
  • Enterprise usage and control does not make things worse

What comes next?

Over the coming months and years, debates will continue over whether or not the new platforms and newly created tools will replace, augment, or see occasional use relative to the tools with which we are all familiar. Changes as significant as those we are experiencing right now happen two ways, at first gradually and then quickly, to paraphrase Hemingway. Some might find little need or incentive to change. Others have already embraced the changes. Perhaps those right now on the cusp, realize that the benefits of their new device and new apps are gradually taking over their most important work and information needs. All of these will happen. This makes for a healthy dialog.