Creating a dynamic learning process in the fast lane!


It’s imperative to bring creativity to learning, enabling us to be innovative!

Greatest challenge to innovation: reinventing our whole way of living!

Walking the positive road!
Building the NEW! Cultivate change! Do it with passion!

PASSIONS create future!
Find strength in your uniqueness of your purpose, your gifts & your passions!

Imagine what could be, to be the future!
Happiness is a journey not a destination!

“Forget about the ‘fast lane’. If you really want to fly, just harness your power to your passion!” ~ Oprah Winfrey

psdt-from-growth-to-progress

from obsessed growth to healthy progress

presentation available on SlideShare (follow the link)

 

Speaking engagement at International Training & Development Summit (Circuits of Learning and Development)

Presentation for PSDT (Philippine Society for Training and Development) annual convention November 2017

http://www.pstd.org

Advertisements

Inspire one – 1x = X1 – motivate many! People – Planet – Progress – Purpose – Passion


Follow the blog by @knowledgEnabler & @econologics and discover the 5P’s of sustainable thrivability.
knowledgEvolution – incisive knowledge converged


@econologics – sustainable balance in our social & economic circle of life!
ecoNVERGE – inspire ● balance ● harmony
Think, lead and act without the box!
We change the way we LIVE! – We change the way of LIFE!

Resilience over strength!


Principles for Open Innovation and Open Leadingship! 
– by Joi Ito, transcripted with a wealth of notes by Peter Vander Auwera
Diminishing cost of innovation makes those having the money behave a little bit better. Who is thinking about those ideas that don’t start small? Thinking about it as a community. This is less about empowering the individual, more about empowering the community.

Disruptive technologies and business models

Today, the majority of the start-ups in Silicon Valley no longer are tech companies. The ruthless new-borns are there to disrupt entire industries: it is rife with pioneers that are aiming to shake up the world of healthcare, medicine and many more.

In a brief address delivered at the MIT-Knight Civic Media Conference, Media Lab director Joi Ito proposed the "9 Principles" that will guide the Media Lab's work under his leadership.

In a brief address delivered at the MIT-Knight Civic Media Conference, Media Lab director Joi Ito proposed the “9 Principles” that will guide the Media Lab’s work under his leadership.

“What was new for me in this tour was the power shift towards “fan-base” and “peer-base”. And the difference between platform-thinking and peer-thinking.” – Peter Vander Auwera
All these companies are lean and on target using the latest sophisticated technology to drive the social physics deeper and deeper.. Shopping no eBay with pay pal can have item in hour now in Manhattan.. This is just the tip of iceberg… of this exponential movement into accelerating returns.
While many enterprises are hesitantly making their first moves into platform-thinking, trying to avoid the Uberization of their own business, we are already witnessing the appearance of full peer-to-peer networks, where the infrastructure and business frameworks are owned by the peers, by the commons.
The 9 principles of open innovation – by Joi Ito
  1. Disobedience over compliance
  2. Pull over push
  3. Compasses over maps
  4. Emergence over authority
  5. Learning over education
  6. Resilience over strength
  7. Systems over objects
  8. Risk over safety
  9. Practice over theory
The Uberization of Everything, and beyond - an evaluation by Peter Vander Auwera

The Uberization of Everything, and beyond – an evaluation by Peter Vander Auwera

Resilience over strength

In stead of bulk-up and resist failure, invest the same money on recovery and resilience. You tend to try to minimize failure, rather than trying to work on resilience. It’s also kind of a Zen thing too. If you are extremely present and ready for anything, your are in an extremely resilient state. And it you are not present, you are always focused on the future, or the past, you try to build up walls and trying to make sure that you don’t get choved. And it is hard when you are surrounded by other planners in an institution like this (Knite Foundation) you tend to focus on structure, strength versus resilience, the structure vs this bounciness. On the Internet, a lot of the pieces are very resilient, when you are in an institution that uses a lot of planning; it is hard to create that interface.
How to share knowledge?

The conference model is a great system. A lot of people have experimented with ways to try to share knowledge, but it seems to be one of the hardest problems because everybody has a day-job, they are very busy, and people are talking sort of different languages, and when you are face to face you can coordinate your language in real-time

 

How to you get people who are working on things coordinated?

At the Media Lab we have several approaches: we have this sort of big data, data mining, machine learning, predicting things through causalities and patterns vs something where people are more in charge and people are more active.

 

From authoritative to creative leadership

“The natural perspective of artists and designers — who thrive in ambiguity, fail productively, and rebound naturally — will be become more and more useful in leadership contexts.”

The chart was originally created for a workshop at the Davos World Economic Forum in 2009 and became the basis of ‘Redesigning Leadership’ written with Becky Bermont.

There are authoritative leaders and creative leaders everywhere — it’s not something wholly determined by industry, generation, or position. And every leader will need, on any given day, a little bit of both types of leadership.

‘Redesigning Leadership’ By John Maeda

‘Redesigning Leadership’ By John Maeda

Joi’s talk makes us reflect on the openness of innovation, Maeda adds the openness of leadingship.
See also:  “The End of Leadership”, by Peter Vander Auwera – on principles for Leadingship vs. Leadership
Leadingship vs Leadership Peter Vander Auwera

Leadingship vs Leadership Peter Vander Auwera

By granting power to people in gaining personal control and in becoming personally responsible for their actions, we are at the same time granting them real freedom to become true equals and fully human beings.

It is not difficult to understand that being an object of delegation and a recipient of giving (as a token of shared power), a person can naturally feel the humiliating bitterness engendered by being a powerless and subservient receiver and not having the authority in exercising personal freedom.

The result of this type of submissive role-behaviour, would possible entail the undermining of self-esteem, self-worth, and self-respect.

The most obvious flaw in the context of power concentration in the hands of persons in charge of others is the assumption that delegated responsibility is analogous to a commodity that can be shared among individuals or groups.

 

From Ego-system to Eco-system – Leading from the Emerging Future!


The problem with capitalism originates between our ears!
– by Otto Scharmer of Theory-U and Presencing Institute brings the best-ever overview of requirements of the Transition Narrative (ecoNVERGE / @ Econologics) for humanity to evolve to a new Paradigm Shift.

Otto Schramer

The root cause of today’s global crises originates between our ears

 

Profound personal, societal and global renewal is not only possible; it is crucial for our planetary future. What is needed are change makers willing to lead from the emerging future; leaders who are willing to learn about and practice the journey from ego-system to eco-system economies. We have the places, living examples, frameworks and tools in hand. Now what we need is the co-creative vision and the common will to bringing it into reality.

10 insights from our new book Leading From the Emerging Future: From Ego-system to Eco-system Economies

We live in an age of profound disruption. Global crises, such as finance, food, fuel, water, resource scarcity and poverty challenge just about every aspect of society. Yet, this disruption also brings the possibility of profound personal, societal and global renewal. We need to stop and ask: Why do we collectively create results nobody wants? What keeps us locked into the old ways of operating? And what can we do to transform these root issues that keep us trapped in the patterns of the past?

1) The root cause of today’s global crises originates between our ears — in our outdated paradigms of economic thought

A structural disconnect between:

  • the infinite growth imperative and the finite resources of planet earth;
  • between the Haves and the Have Nots;
  • between the financial and the real economy;
  • between technology and real societal needs;
  • between institutional leadership and people;
  • between gross domestic product (GDP) and actual well-being;
  • between governance mechanisms and the voiceless in our systems; and
  • between actual ownership forms and best societal use of property.

 

Three Levels Symptoms Systemic Disconnects Paradigms of Economic Thought

Three Levels: Symptoms; Systemic Disconnects; Paradigms of Economic Thought

2) The blind spot of modern economic thought can be summarized with a single word: consciousness
3) The evolution of the economy and of modern economic thought mirrors the footprints of an evolving human consciousness

The stages of economic development that come with them:

  • 1.0 Organizing around centralized coordination
  • 2.0 Organizing around decentralized coordination
  • 3.0 Organizing around special interest group driven coordination
  • 4.0 Organizing around commons

4) To paraphrase Einstein, the problem with today’s capitalism is that we are trying “to solve problems with the same consciousness that created them”
5) Helping stakeholder systems shift their way of operating from ego-system to eco-system awareness is the central leadership challenge of our time
6) The shift from ego-system to eco-system awareness requires a journey that involves walking in the shoes of other stakeholders and attending to the three instruments of inner knowing: open mind, open heart, and open will

 

Theory U: One Process, Three Instruments (Open Mind, Open Heart, Open Will)

Theory U: One Process, Three Instruments (Open Mind, Open Heart, Open Will)

 

The effectiveness of accessing these three instruments depends on the ability to deal with the sources of resistance (“three enemies”):

  • VoJ (Voice of Judgment): The VoJ shuts down the Open Mind by habitually judging self and others. All creativity techniques start with somehow suspending the VoJ.
  • VoC (Voice of Cynicism): The VoC shuts down the Open Heart by offering an easy alternative to making oneself vulnerable. The problem with that easy exit is that it does the same thing as the VoJ: it blocks one’s opening process for accessing the deeper sources of creativity.
  • VoF (Voice of Fear): The VoF tends to shut down the Open Will by not letting go but holding on to old identities, ideologies, and Us vs. Them belief structures.

7) Addressing the current global crisis at its root calls for a 4.0 update of the economic operating system through reframing eight “acupuncture points” of the global economic system

They are:

  1. Nature: Close the feedback loop of production, consumption, reuse, and recycling through “earth-to-earth” or closed-loop design.
  2. Labor: Close the feedback loop from work (jobs) to Work (passion) by building infrastructures that foster and ignite inspired entrepreneurship.
  3. Capital: Close the feedback loop of capital by redirecting speculative investment into ecological, social, and cultural-creative renewal.
  4. Technology: Close the feedback loop from technology creation to societal needs in underserved communities through needs assessment and participatory planning.
  5. Leadership: Close the feedback loop from leadership to the emerging future of the whole through practices of co-sensing, co-inspiring, and co-creating.
  6. Consumption: Close the feedback loop from economic output to the well-being of all through conscious, collaborative consuming and through new well-being indicators such as GNH (Gross National Happiness).
  7. Coordination: Close the feedback loop in the economy from the parts to the whole through ABC (awareness-based collective action).
  8. Ownership: Close the feedback loop from ownership rights to the best societal use of assets through shared ownership and commons-based property rights that safeguard the interests of future generations.
Eight Acupuncture Points of Transforming Capitalism to 4.0

Eight Acupuncture Points of Transforming Capitalism to 4.0

 

8) Shifting the system to 4.0 requires a threefold revolution

Inversion means turning inside-out and outside-in:

  • Individual inversion means to open up thinking (open mind), feeling (open heart), and will (open will) in order to learn to act as an instrument for the future that is wanting to emerge.
  • Relational inversion means to open up communicative relationships from downloading (conforming) and debate (defending) to dialogue (reflective inquiry) and collective creativity (flow) in order to tune as groups into the field of the future.
  • Institutional inversion means to open traditional institutional geometries of power from 1.0 and 2.0 forms of coordinating and organizing — centralized hierarchy and decentralized competition — to 3.0 and 4.0 forms of coordinating around co-creative stakeholder relationships in eco-systems that generate well-being for all.
The Matrix of Social Evolution (all system levels, all structures of attention)

The Matrix of Social Evolution (all system levels, all structures of attention)

the three transformations for the individual (column 1), the relational (column 2) and the institutional inversion (column 3 and 4) in the form of a Matrix of Social Evolution that integrates all system levels (micro-meso-maco-mundo) and all structures of awareness (1.0 to 4.0).
9) We need new types of innovation infrastructures in order to build collective leadership capacities on a massive scale

These infrastructures will include:

  • Co-initiating: Creating spaces for convening stakeholders around a shared eco-system
  • Co-sensing: Going to the places of most potential and observing with one’s mind and heart wide open
  • Co-inspiring: Creating spaces for connecting to the sources of creativity and self
  • Co-creating: Creating spaces for exploring the future by doing (prototyping)
  • Co-shaping: Creating spaces for embodying and scaling the new through practices

10) The shift from an ego-system to an eco-system economy requires a global movement that needs to be supported by a new leadership school. That school should create collaborative platforms across sectors, systems, and generations and work through integrating science, art, and the practice of profound, awareness-based change

Such a new leadership school would be a home base for the emerging global movement of 4.0-related transformation journeys. At the same time, it would prototype a 21st century action university that integrates three forms of knowledge:

  • technical knowledge (know-what),
  • practical knowledge (know-how) and
  • transformation knowledge (know-who: self knowledge).

 

An Ego-2-Eco Transformation Leadership School—A Set of Global Acupuncture Points

An Ego-2-Eco Transformation Leadership School—A Set of Global Acupuncture Points

 

Set of principles that are essential for this type of school and which are designed for global-local replication:

  1. Engage systems at all levels and states: Engage systems by using the entire Matrix of Social Evolution.
  2. Engage all levels of intelligence: Integrate open mind (IQ: intellectual knowledge), open heart (EQ: emotional and relational knowledge), and open will (SQ: self knowledge).
  3. Systems Thinking: Integrate methods and tools derived from 30 years of organizational learning research and practice. 
  4. MOOCs: Use massive open online courses that combine course delivery with interactive personal, small-group dialogue and the presence of a global community of change makers that effects transformative change.
  5. Deep immersion: Use deep dive learning journeys and generative listening practices in order to connect communities and places of most potential.
  6. Science 2.0: Use scientific methods that let the “data talk to you.” The challenges of this century involve extending the concept of science beyond looking exclusively at exterior data (third-person view). We need to bend the beam of scientific observation back upon the observer in order to investigate the more subtle levels of experience of the second- and first-person view.
  7. Presencing: Use practices that allow leaders to sense and actualize the emerging future and to clarify the two root questions of creativity: Who is my Self? What is my Work?
  8. Power of Intention: Focus on the capacity to connect with the deeper intention of one’s journey, connecting us more deeply with one another, the world and ourselves.
  9. Prototyping: Link head, heart, and hand in order to create living examples and prototypes that allow us to explore the future by doing.
  10. Power of Place: Complement the massive expansion of online learning with an equally massive global network of vibrant entrepreneurial hubs that focus on activating co-sensing and co-creating as a gateway for unleashing entrepreneurial potential. Great innovations happen in places. Learning how to design and hold spaces for reflection, generative conversation, and system-wide transformation is a mission critical capacity today.

Enterprise Incisive Converged Knowledge – New tools and a new way of working for a new era!


Continuous Productivity: New tools and a new way of working for a new era!
– paper by Steven Sinofsky
excerpt from Learning by Shipping
Note by CAPix: This paper describes very well how we are moving into Enterprise Incisive Converged Knowledge. Technologies are developing, organizations are adapting and new generations of people coming on board of the workforce are defining how collaboration is evolving between people, data and technology.

It also makes for an amazing opportunity to transform how organizations make products, serve customers, and do the work of corporations. We’re on the verge of seeing an entire rewrite of the management canon of the 20th century. New ways of organizing, managing, working, collaborating are being enabled by the tools of the continuous productivity paradigm shift.

 

553698_10101017579649025_101860817_nclick the picture for the full article by Steven Sinofsky

What happens when the tools and technologies we use every day become mainstream parts of the business world? What happens when we stop leading separate “consumer” and “professional” lives when it comes to technology stacks? The result is a dramatic change in the products we use at work and as a result an upending of the canon of management practices that define how work is done.

This paper says business must embrace the consumer world and see it not as different, less functional, or less enterprise-worthy, but as the new path forward for how people will use technology platforms, how businesses will organize and execute work, and how the roles of software and hardware will evolve in business.

Paradigm shift

Continuous productivity is an era that fosters a seamless integration between consumer and business platforms. Today, tools and platforms used broadly for our non-work activities are often used for work, but under the radar.

Continuous productivity manifests itself as an environment where the evolving tools and culture make it possible to innovate more and faster than ever, with significantly improved execution. Continuous productivity shifts our efforts from the start/stop world of episodic work and work products to one that builds on the technologies that start to answer what happens when:

  • A generation of new employees has access to the collective knowledge of an entire profession and experts are easy to find and connect with.
  • Collaboration takes place across organization and company boundaries with everyone connected by a social fiber that rises above the boundaries of institutions.
  • Data, knowledge, analysis, and opinion are equally available to every member of a team in formats that are digital, sharable, and structured.
  • People have the ability to time slice, context switch, and proactively deal with situations as they arise, shifting from a world of start/stop productivity and decision-making to one that is continuous.

Knowledge productivity

The problems created by the success of mechanized production were met with a solution—the introduction of the computer and the start of the information revolution. The mid-20th century would kick off a revolution in business, business marked by global and connected organizations. Knowledge created a new culture of business derived from the information gathering and analysis capabilities of first the mainframe and then the PC.

The essence of knowledge was the people-centric office which focused on ever-improving analysis and decision-making to allocate capital, develop products and services, and coordinate the work across the globe. The modern organization model of a board of directors, executives, middle management, and employees grew out of these new capabilities. Management of these knowledge-centric organizations happened through an ever-increasing network of middle-managers. The definition of work changed and most employees were not directly involved in making things, but in analyzing, coordinating, or servicing the products and services a company delivered.

The information available to management grew exponentially. Middle-management grew to spend their time researching, tabulating, reporting, and reconciling the information sources available. Information spanned from quantitative to qualitative and the successful leaders were expert or well versed in not just navigating or validating information, but in using it to effectively influence the organization as a whole. Knowledge is power in this environment. Management took over the role of resource allocation from owners and focused on decision-making as the primary effort, using knowledge and the skills of middle management to inform those choices.

Today’s workplace: Continuous Productivity
Today’s workplace is as different as the office was from the factory.

Today’s organizations are either themselves mobile or serving customers that are mobile, or likely both. Mobility is everywhere we look—from apps for consumers to sales people in stores and the cash registers to plane tickets. With mobility comes an unprecedented degree of freedom and flexibility—freedom from locality, limited information, and the desktop computer.

The knowledge-based organization spent much energy on connecting the dots between qualitative sampling and data sourced on what could be measured.

The following table contrasts the way we work between the historic norms and continuous productivity.

The following table contrasts the way we work between the historic norms and continuous productivity.

Transition versus disruption

The biggest risks organizations face is in thinking the transition to a new way of working will be just that, a transition, rather than a disruption. While individuals within an organization, particularly those that might be in senior management, will seek to smoothly transition from one style of work to another, the bulk of employees will switch quickly. Interns, new hires, or employees looking for an edge see these changes as the new normal or the only normal they’ve ever experienced. Our own experience with PCs is proof of how quickly change can take place.

Culture of continuous productivity

The culture of continuous productivity enabled by new tools is literally a rewrite of the past 30 years of management doctrine. Hierarchy, top-down decision making, strategic plans, static competitors, single-sided markets, and more are almost quaint views in a world literally flattened by the presence of connectivity, mobility, and data. The impact of continuous productivity can be viewed through the organization, individuals and teams, and the role of data.

The cultural changes encouraged or enabled by continuous productivity include:

  • Innovate more and faster
  • Flatten hierarchy
  • Improve execution
  • Respond to changes using telemetry / data
  • Strengthen organization and partnerships
  • Focus on the destination, not the journey

Organization culture change

Continuously productive organizations look and feel different from traditional organizations. As a comparison, consider how different a reunion (college, family, etc.) is in the era of Facebook usage. When everyone gets together there is so much more that is known—the reunion starts from shared context and “intimacy”. Organizations should be just as effective, no matter how big or how geographically dispersed.

Effective organizations were previously defined by rhythms of weekly, monthly and quarterly updates. These “episodic” connection points had high production values (and costs) and ironically relatively low retention and usage. Management liked this approach as it placed a high value on and required active management as distinct from the work. Tools were designed to run these meetings or email blasts, but over time these were far too often over-produced and tended to be used more for backward looking pseudo-accountability.

Looking ahead, continuously productive organizations will be characterized by the following:

  • Execution-centric focus
  • Management framing context with teams deciding
  • Outside is your friend
  • Employees see management participate and learn, everyone has the tools of management
  • Individuals own devices, organizations develop and manage IP

Individuals and teams work differently

The new tools and techniques come together to improve upon the way individuals and teams interact. Just as the first communication tools transformed business, the tools of mobile and continuous productivity change the way interactions happen between individuals and teams.

  • Sense and respond
  • Bottom up and network centric
  • Team and crowd spanning the internal and external
  • Unstructured work rhythm

Data becomes pervasive (and big)

With software capabilities come ever-increasing data and information. While the 20th century enabled the collection of data and to a large degree the analysis of data to yield ever improving decisions in business, the prevalence of continuous data again transforms business.

  • Sharing data continuously
  • Always up to date
  • Yielding best statistical approach informed by telemetry (induction)
  • Valuing more usage

New generation of productivity tools, examples and checklist

Bringing together new technologies and new methods for management has implications that go beyond the obvious and immediate. We will all certainly be bringing our own devices to work, accessing and contributing to work from a variety of platforms, and seeing our work take place across organization boundaries with greater ease. We can look very specifically at how things will change across the tools we use, the way we communicate, how success is measured, and the structure of teams.

Tools will be quite different from those that grew up through the desktop PC era. At the highest level the implications about how tools are used are profound. New tools are being developed today—these are not “ports” of existing tools for mobile platforms, but ideas for new interpretations of tools or new combinations of technologies.

The user experience of this new generation of productivity tools takes on a number of attributes that contrast with existing tools, including:

  • Continuous v. episodic
  • Online and shared information
  • Low startup costs
  • Sharing inside and outside
  • Measured enterprise integration
  • Mobile first
  • Devices in many sizes

Building on the sealed case platform, a new generation of applications will exhibit a significant number of the following attributes at the architecture and implementation level. As with all transitions, debates will rage over the relative strength or priority of one or more attributes for an app or scenario (“is something truly cloud” or historically “is this a native GUI”). Over time, if history is any guide, the preferred tools will exhibit these and other attributes as a first or native priority, and de-prioritize the checklists that characterized the “best of” apps for the previous era.

The following is a checklist of attributes of tools for continuous productivity:

  • Mobile first
  • Cloud first
  • User experience is platform native or browser exploitive
  • Tools are discrete, loosely coupled, limited surface area
  • Data contributed is data extractable
  • Metadata is as important as data
  • Files move from something you manage to something you use when needed
  • Identity is a choice
  • User experience has a memory and is aware and predictive
  • Telemetry is essential / privacy redefined
  • Participation is a feature
  • Business communication becomes indistinguishable from social
  • Enterprise usage and control does not make things worse

What comes next?

Over the coming months and years, debates will continue over whether or not the new platforms and newly created tools will replace, augment, or see occasional use relative to the tools with which we are all familiar. Changes as significant as those we are experiencing right now happen two ways, at first gradually and then quickly, to paraphrase Hemingway. Some might find little need or incentive to change. Others have already embraced the changes. Perhaps those right now on the cusp, realize that the benefits of their new device and new apps are gradually taking over their most important work and information needs. All of these will happen. This makes for a healthy dialog.

 

Standing on the shoulders of the OD founders!


– by John Scherer

We learn from the giants who laid out the path for us, more than 3000 years ago.

 

The founders of Organization Development have rooted the tree of OD that grew over centuries. We are on the branches which continue to grow in practicing OD.

 

OD family tree

 

Sigmund Freud – We live life inside 3 interacting domains: self, other people and life!

 

Carl Young – Besides the unconsciousness driving us, there is also a collective unconsciousness. We also have a shadow which is projected on other people close to us!

 

From here John Scherer leads into performance management, conflict resolution, empowerment, leadership, personal development across life stages, motivation, human psychologist, whole personality/character, self esteem and personal growth, transactional counselling, self-help.

 

From here Sherer takes it to the giants of OD:

Frederick Taylor: skill management and coordination, matrix management and quality of life – how to make organizations better

Kurt Lewin: applied behavioural science, seeing what is happening – action research, ownership participation, sensitivity training in group dynamics,

Wilfred Bion: leaderless/self-managing groups, cross functional team learning and shared responsibility, recognizing leadership abilities, focusing on process driven approach

– Douglas mcGregor: X and Y Theory management – motivation and responsibility approach, application oriented OD

 

standing on the shoulders of the OD founders

 

What we learned from the OD founders:

1. No research without action, no action without research

2. Everything is connected, especially technology and people

3. Change is the only constant

4. Small groups are key

5. The people who give you data own it

6. Break existing patterns with people, by involving them

7. Leaders must be authentic (emotional intelligence) and human as well as technically sharp

 

 

A working definition by Billie Alban, John Scherer

OD is the application of action research and systems theory, using participative processes with human systems to increase the internal and external effectiveness of that system and its stakeholders – especially in working with change.

 

– Essential is to engage the entire organization in the process

– People participation in the process of change

– eliminate silo-building and engage with all stakeholders

– It is all about adapting to change

 

To conclude:

Practicing Organization Development – by William J. Rothwell and Roland Sullivan

 

 

Building frames to face the challenges on our journey!


 

“Decide before you get seduced!” – Jennifer Sertl

 

Be open to new ways, away from your traditional thinking – thinking without the box enables you to establish alternative paths to overcome the challenges faced.

 

Jennifer Sertl interview part 1

 

Interview with Jennifer Sertl
Co-Author of “Strategy, Leadership and the Soul” and

Founder, President at Agility3R = Resilience, Responsiveness and Reflection

 

Jennifer Sertl
Jennifer highlights: Our competitive advantage is not what we do or where we work but the accuracy with which we scan the macro (meta analysis) and the physical actions we (can) take as part of the shift.

 

note: the following is a review of the interview and does not always represent in full the wordings used in the conversations, sometimes providing a reflection of the thoughts expressed and anticipated.


 

Jennifer mentions Thomas Friedman‘s ‘The World is Flat!’ as the basis for her journey – so was mine, I just wished he had written it 10 years earlier
For those who have missed the past 8 years, we suggest to read this book or read it again – for young and old, students and parents, any generation. Thomas Friedman has established the roots and highlighted clear guidelines for how to become resilient with the changing times – back in 2005 (2nd edition).
He can be recognized as the Father of Thrivability

 
Thanks Michael L. Hartsell / Michel Bauwens (P2P Foundation for Open Technology) for enabling and sharing the value in the message carried to your circle of connectedness!

 

 

Building frames to absorb the complexity!

 

Jennifer Sertl interview part 1

Existence is prior to essence: an environment impacts the behaviour of people and we should appreciate the strength in the ties we have in our connectedness, visible or invisible.
Collectively, individuals can make an impact for the whole!

Being attentive to the shifts taking place in our environment, means you can identify your place and role being part of the shift. Through your connectedness, one can be integral part of the shift in your environment – whether that is your immediate circle of connectedness, such as family, friends and colleagues, or local or even global.

To break the complexity of challenges faced, identify patterns (use your curiosity). Once you pass that stage you can leverage through design in frameworks to facilitate the change needed for self and your environment.

Challenging realities guides respect in a trusted environment.

 

 

How to behave in new style vs old style corporations!

 

Jennifer Sertl interview part 2

Businesses learn to cooperate together which creates a whole new dimension of possibilities, thinking and problem solving.

Along the way companies need to seek closer alignment to what matters and how decisions come about.

In new style companies, employees are no longer just part of the assigned function, but become project-based consultants in their expertise to the rest of the cross-functional team (avoiding the silo behaviour).

Collaboration within teams also becomes more borderless and drives the alertness to know when to lead and when to follow.

 

Remain or refocus on the original entrepreneurial spirit and visions is essential to remain creative at the forefront and keep or gain market share, potentially become a new trendsetter within the industry.

 

 

The economy – the expectations!

 

The end of growth as we knew it, is a fait-a-compli – we need to accept this and find ways to look at different ways of bringing value to our motivations to progress.

From the great disruption to the great distribution, we need to evolve from a source to a conduit, whereby we act as channels of information in which we are not an owner or expert, rather have the ability to distribute it – with potentially added or changed information relevant to own expertise and what is needed by the receiver. That approach stimulates the collaborative economy, in which we need to move away from individuality and individual contributors, focusing on the throughput, not just as individual contributors but as a collaborative effort, part of the whole process.

The biggest inhibitor / contributor to our success right now is nostalgia and enabling clustered knowledge through connecting people. Value comes forth from the collective US, our combined talents. Our collective thinking is the new ‘know’!

 

 

How to be a conduit, a connector!

 

Jennifer Sertl interview part 3

Knowledge convergence and knowledge clusters will lead to global innovation in ways that never happened before.

The issue of information overload is no longer an existing dilemma; rather filter failure is what is holding us up. What and how to filter through and to whom – the recipient. For this to function, corporations and people, teams, collaborative groups, … need to establishes their essential themes which drive their information adaptability, their processes activated and the decisions taken, ensuring no seduction from outside those set/agreed themes.

Decide before you get seduced!

The approach to impact behaviour by corporations to their markets (consumers) needs revision and taken away from the idea that marketing allows manipulating people consumption behaviour in which they buy what they don’t need, with money they don’t have, just because of anticipating greater happiness or satisfaction then what you have so far.

The seduction is all around us and we are impacted by our environment and the collective thinking and behaviour.

How many MBA’s does it take – who have the ability of systems thinking – to get us out of the financial crisis. Most of them are trumped in their own thinking, influenced – seduced – by the collective manifestation of the environment.

 

In conclusion

To be part of an environment where there is value creation in collaboration we can thrive as individuals and as humanity as a whole.

 

 

 References

Jennifer Sertl (US) is a thought leader in the emerging field of corporate consciousness, where she uses the convergence of Neuroscience and Existential Philosophy fostering inspiration and subsequently creating strategic advantage and enhancing value. She is an internationally respected author, keynote speaker and the president and founder of Agility3R an organizational effectiveness company which primarily focuses upon the optimization of customer value by aligning corporate objectives with the individuals responsible for delivering results. 

Layne Hartsell (US) is a researcher in the philosophy of ethics and technology, and teaches and does research in health science/biomedicine. Current research covers nanotechnology for developing countries. He is a partner at the P2P Foundation’s Open Technology Transfer Group and Co-Founder of Seoul Global Study Group.